Environmental law

  • Shipping Offshore, Maritime and Offshore Emergency Response, Ocean Industries, Environmental Law

    2020

    Maritime casualties in the High North

    As noted in the white paper on Norway's Arctic policy (the High North Report), maritime activities in the High North are expected to increase as a result of improved accessibility resulting from melting sea-ice, the high potential for increased commercial exploitation of marine and offshore resources, and successful marketing of the Arctic as a tourist destination. With increased activities comes an increased risk of accidents.

  • Shipping Offshore, Environmental law, Sustainability, Ocean Industries

    2020

    The High North Report – an "ocean of opportunities"?

    On 27 November 2020 the Norwegian government presented a white paper on the High North with the title "People, opportunities and Norwegian interests in the Arctic" (the "High North Report"). The report is the first white paper on the Northern region in nine years, and sets out the government's policy on foreign relations, climate change and environmental concerns, community development, business, infrastructure, transport and safety.

  • Shipping Offshore, Environmental law, Sustainability, Ocean Industries

    2020

    Beefing up emission and fuel standards in the Arctic

    It has been a long time coming, and on 20 November 2020 the 75th session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 75) approved a "ban" on the use and carriage of so-called heavy fuel oil ("HFO") in the Arctic. The new regulation makes amendments to the Polar Code, as implemented in MARPOL. It is expected that the proposed amendments will be formally adopted at the next MEPC session in June 2021. However, more stringent standards have already been proposed by the Norwegian government for the area surrounding Svalbard.

  • Shipping Offshore, Environmental law, Sustainability, Ocean Industries

    2020

    Norwegian ocean management – modern or still very traditional?

    With Jens Evensen in the forefront, Norway was a pioneer in the development of the law of the sea in the 70s. However, the traditional law of the sea as we know it, with its zonal and sectoral approach, is not sustainable. Through the High North Report, the Norwegian government is laying the foundations for what will be Norwegian foreign policy for the next 10 years. Is Norway once again capable of being a pioneer in the development of a modern law of the sea?